The USPTO

The USPTO

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is the federal agency for granting U.S. patents and registering trademarks.

The USPTO registers trademarks based on the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution. (Article 1, Section 8, Clause 3). Today, the U.S. federal trademark laws are collectively known as The Lanham Act, Title 15 U.S.C §§ 1051 et seq.

 

  • The USPTO reviews trademark applications and determines whether the applied-for mark meets the requirements for federal registration.
  • The USPTO is more than an approval system – it houses one of the largest repositories of scientific and technical knowledge in the world. It is an organization dedicated to the promotion and progress of science and the useful arts, to bolstering the strength and vitality of the U.S. economy by protecting new ideas and investments in innovation and creativity.
  • The USPTO advises the President of the United States, the Secretary of Commerce, and U.S. Government agencies on intellectual property (IP) policy, protection, and enforcement; and promotes the stronger and more effective IP protection around the world.
  • The USPTO furthers effective IP protection for U.S. innovators and entrepreneurs worldwide by working with other agencies to secure strong IP provisions in free trade and other international agreements. It also provides training, education, and capacity building programs designed to foster respect for IP and encourage the development of strong IP enforcement regimes by U.S. trading partners.
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